Storage And Data Transfer

Storage And Data Transfer
Storage And Data Transfer
File history can indeed be used to transfer data files from one Windows 10 installation to another. However, my response surprised me and sent me to a Google search mission. The results show that the majority of Windows 10 users have problems using File History-so they conclude it can not be used to transfer data files.

I then started a week backups and restored the expedition with File History, where I managed to transfer data from one installation of Windows 10 to several more times. Along the way, I can replicate some of the most common mistakes people make and find ways to overcome them.

In this article, I'll walk you step-by-step through the correct way to use File History to restore files in a new Windows 10 installation. As I do, I'll show you some of the most common stumbling blocks and explain how to avoid them. In the next week's article, I'll show you how to deal with the end result of the stumbling block if you've fallen prey to them.

Storage And Data Transfer

Working assumptions

To get started, I'll make some assumptions. Of course, since we are talking about transferring existing data from one Windows 10 installation to another, I assume that you have used File History to back up your data files on an external USB hard disk. I'll also assume that you're signed into both your Windows 10 systems using the same Microsoft account. (Doing so will make it easier to replicate certain settings in your old Windows 10 installation to your new Windows 10. installation.For example, you will find the same account picture, wallpaper, and email account in your new Windows 10 installation.)

Start
After you log into your new Windows 10 installation, connect an external hard disk containing your History File backup to your PC. When Windows recognizes a USB drive, click Start and type in File History. You will then see the File History screen shown in Figure A, which informs you that no file history has been found and the File History is turned off. This is normal, because you have not run File History in your new Windows 10 installation.

The first stumbling block

To continue, click Configure File History to display the History History screen shown in Figure B. This screen is where people make the two most common mistakes.

Figure B

To begin with, the main message on this screen is that the File History is turned off. So it seems logical that the first thing you should do is click the Turn On button. However, it is a mistake. When you do, File History will start creating new backups immediately and you will never get a chance to recover an existing backup.

The second mistake people make is to assume that selecting a checkbox titled I Want To Use Previous Backup In Drive History This file will start the recovery operation immediately. You select the checkbox, select an existing backup, and click the Turn On button. You will then be prompted to click Run Now. But instead of starting a restore operation, File History will start creating new backups immediately. Thinking that is not what should happen, many users panic and click the Stop button. If you do, you will never get a chance to recover an existing backup.

In both cases, you will not get a chance to restore the existing backup because I Want To Use Previous Backup In Drive Drive History This file will never appear again once File History creates a new backup.
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